Still life by Victoria Ivanova

Published June 8, 2015 in Blog

Russian photographer Victoria Ivanova’s interest is in giving character and soul to static objects. She’s made still-life art from nothing more than clothes pegs, vegetables or chess pieces.  As a photographer she got that imagination gift to be able to translate a full imaginary story out of her mind to be a picture in a frame carrying a full story where the observant catch it from the first seen. Lights, perspectives, lens and  objects all together gives us that new great inspiration of artwork using an ordinary and regular things to produce new style and ideas of photography. Source: 500px.com; photo.net; 1x.com © […]

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“A girl and her cat” by Andy Prokh

Published December 3, 2014 in Blog

An economist and photography enthusiast Andy Prokh takes adorable black and white photos of his 5-year-old daughter Katherine and her best friend – a British Shorthair cat, named LiLu Blue Royal Lada. The cat was already 2 years old when Andy’s baby daughter was born, and the two have been hanging out ever since. The pictures portray their every day activities, where Katherine and Lilu seem to be very comfortable and happy with each other’s company.  The pair has come to be known by fans as “A Girl And Her Cat“. “I like to take photos of them because I […]

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Ballet in action

Published November 30, 2014 in Blog

Interested in movement Paul Himmel’s book Ballet in Action was published in 1954. George Balanchine one of the great leading choreographers rightly saluted Himmel’s achievement of succeeding in ‘the almost impossible task of getting stills that look like movement….the sense of and the sequences of movement are present.”. His innate feeling for dance as much as the sophistication of his photographic technique (he used very long exposure times) was a distillation of the very essence of dance, conveyed in poetic and graphically powerful images. Himmel continued on this path and started experimenting more with grain structure, that he radically transformed […]

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Bert Hardy’s photographs

Published October 28, 2014 in Blog

The eldest of seven children, Bert Hardy rose from humble working class origins in Blackfriars, London, leaving school at age 14 to work for a chemist where he learnt how to chemically process photos. After selling 200 prints of King George V and Queen Mary passing by in a carriage, he went on to freelance for The Bicycle magazine, saving up to buy a second-hand, small-format Leica 35 mm camera which was to change his life. Self taught and using the small Leica camera instead of the traditional larger press cameras, Hardy was recruited by the editor of Picture Post, […]

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Minimalism in Photography

Published October 20, 2014 in Blog

Contrary to what it may seem at a first glance, minimalism in photography is open to a lot of creativity, while, of course, the rules of minimalism are applied. Taking photos that would be in the minimalist photography category is not that easy. The elements that are put into the photo must be kept to a minimum, but the ones that are present should be significant to the overall idea and symbolism of the photo. If you are interested in minimalist photography, you can take a look at these examples for inspiration so you can see how other photographers managed […]

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Lillian Bassman

Published October 13, 2014 in Blog

Lillian Bassman was born in 1917 into an immigrant family of free-thinking intellectuals, and was brought up with a mindset that allowed her to live as an independent and unconventional woman. Bassman had transformed these photographs into original works of art through her darkroom techniques in which she blurs and bleaches the images, investing them with poetry, mystery, and glamour. The most notable qualities about her photographic work are the high contrasts between light and dark, the graininess of the finished photos, and the geometric placement and camera angles of the subjects. Her photographs have been featured internationally in gallery and […]

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Diane Paquin

Published October 13, 2014 in Blog

Sursa: http://dianepaquin13.wix.com/ 1,549 total views, no views today

1,549 total views, no views today

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Václav Chochola

Published October 10, 2014 in Blog

Moving between art photography, documentary and straightforward reporting, Václav Chochola has found many of his motifs on the outskirts of Prague, where he was born. Inspired by Surrealism, Skupina 42, urban life, and post-war Existentialism, he is best known for his seminal 1960s nudes and his personality-driven portraits. 3,149 total views, no views today

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Christoper Lee Donovan

Published October 10, 2014 in Blog

“Every bio and artist’s statement I’ve ever written makes me cringe. They are scattered throughtout the internet and a complete embarassment. I lose enjoy of creating a new finished piece almost immediatelly. The time it takes me to tear it apart with criticism can be a matter of hours.” More photos: http://www.christopherleedonovan.com 2,484 total views, no views today

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“Exquisite Corpse” by artists of the Surrealist movement

Published October 7, 2014 in Blog

Exquisite Corpse it’s a game in which each participant takes turns writing or drawing on a sheet of paper, folds it to conceal his or her contribution, without being able to see what others have drawn on the paper, then passes it to the next player for a further contribution. The game gained popularity in artistic circles during the 1920’s, when it was adopted as a technique by artists of the Surrealist movement. Exquisite Corpse was a perfect parlor game, involving elements of unpredictability, chance, unseen elements, and group collaboration—all in service of disrupting the waking mind’s penchant for order. […]

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Man Ray – Série Nu aux bandelettes, circa 1928-1929 © Man Ray Trust

Published October 7, 2014 in Blog

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PIERRE’S CHIMERA

Published October 7, 2014 in Blog

Molinier was born in 1900. From 1920 he studied as a painter, progressing in style through Realism and Impressionism to abstraction. By 1936 he was producing surreal Symbolist works in which he interwove Moreau-esque imagery with a fascination for the more savage aspects of ancient Egyptian and Indian religions, Satanism and the teachings of the Brotherhood, a secret masonic order which he had joined in the 1920s. It was in these paintings of cruel, multi-limbed women, reminiscent of the work of Hans Belmer, that the artist began his investigation of the sexual ambiguity which was to become his obsession. In […]

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